Category Archives: Handicappers

How to Organise A Charity Golf Day

Charlie Goodwin

Charlie Goodwin

Sports betting can add excitement and fun to any game and will keep you on the edge of your seat throughout! Please remember, never give up as you have chosen one of the best businesses you could ever get into!
Charlie Goodwin

Latest posts by Charlie Goodwin (see all)

We ask if they are to provide their own advertising banner to place around the hole or if they would like us to provide one. We were lucky enough to find the Hearn Group of Companies in Dorchester and they have made a regular contribution to all of our events

Book a golf course well in advance of the event and settle the amount they want to charge and agree what is to be provided. A dustbin is placed on the 18th fairway at an average driving length so the big hitters have to throttle down if they want to win and the highest handicappers still have a chance of winning. Make sure any one who is going to run the auction is “pushy” so you get as much from the auction as possible.

A general point is to make sure that you have enough people helping your golf dayand they all need to know what you want them to do. For the team score we count the best 2 scores for the first 6 holes,the best 3 scores on holes 7 to 12 and all scores on the last 6 holes. If the ball gets lost the team does not qualify.

www.redpost-golf-society.co.uk

To raise as much money for your Chosen Charity by any means you canthink of!

First select your chosen cause and set a realistic target

Seek a local business as a major sponsor. We have enlisted the help of a lovely lady who registers all the players, enters scores and sells the £10 envelopes, she is probably the reason we get such a good uptake in selling these!

DORSET-Home of The Redpost Golf Society

The Redpost Golf Society based in Dorset in the UK have now run 4 Charity events and raised in excess of £12000 and would like to pass on to anyone who has an interest in golf and is looking to run a Charity golf day how we have done it and hope it proves helpful.Organising a golf day is great fun and rewarding but it is hard work and you need to constantly badger people to help you out.

HAVE FUN AND A SUCCESSFUL DAY

Finally remember what you are doing this for-

How we have done it …….

Who we are…….. this makes it slightly easier for the person collating the scores. The way the yellow ball competition works is that each team starts with a yellow ball and each player in turn has to use this ball. If you stress that it is for charity they are normally happy to help financially.

Start getting teams to enter we try to get teams of 4 which means that it is easier to organise when they are playing. you can contact us on www.redpost-golf-society.co.uk We also run a yellow ball competition and a nearest the mystery prize on the 18th fairway. A good source of prizes are from local golf clubs who are usually willing to donate green fee tickets especially if you have played on their course. We get them to pay a set amount for the hole ( charge more for 1 and 18 as most sponsors seem to like these holes). We had about a 95% take up.

Get prizes. the prize is anything we need to get rid of and has included a beer cooler, a battery drill and a case of beer.

We have also held auctions after the golf and we have put up lots such as holidays,tickets to sports events, restaurant vouchers, football club shirts and anything else that you can cajole people and businesses into giving. Anyone without the tickets cannot enter the competitions. You will need to buy trophies as you see fit for overall winner, Nearest Pin, longest Drive, Champion Putter etc.

We play full handicap scoring for both team competition and individual. we have an arrangement with a manufacturer so we make a small profit on this.

Organise a draw to be drawn on the day. All the scores with this ball are added up at the end of the round and we give a prize usually a green fee voucher to the winning team. We have in our latest event charged £10 for an envelope which includes draw tickets and an entry into the putting competition ,Nearest the Pin and Longest Drive. Anyone who has reasonable Excel skills can easily develop a programme to add up these scores, if not we are happy to sell you a copy of ours at nominal cost. We have been lucky that we have been able to enlist the services of a local farmer who has conducted many auctions and is also an entertainer in his own right. But don’t turn down single players as you can usually make up more teams from these single players.

Find sponsors for each hole. We have also approached with great success, local organisations providing such things as Shepherds Hut holidays, Gliding, Zorbing, Shooting and alpaca walking. This needs to include what food and refreshments they can offer, free use of buggies to place advertising banners on the course, Nearest the Pin and Longest Drive markers and anything else you can think of see here


The Best Horse Racing Books

Charlie Goodwin

Charlie Goodwin

Sports betting can add excitement and fun to any game and will keep you on the edge of your seat throughout! Please remember, never give up as you have chosen one of the best businesses you could ever get into!
Charlie Goodwin

Latest posts by Charlie Goodwin (see all)

The information is certainly a bit dated, but there’s still lots of good food for thought considering the book was published 25 years ago.

The Odds Must Be Crazy by Len Ragozin

Ragozin is the creator of the famous “Sheets” performance figures (which some consider a bargain at $25 a pop), and this autobiography cum handicapping tome gives a broad overview of how the numbers are created as well as how their users employ pattern matching to find live horses that may offer solid value in the mutual pools. Not a great place to start for the novice, but well worth reading for more experienced players.

Kinky Handicapping by Mark Cramer

Cramer is one of the most entertaining and thought-provoking handicapping writers there is, and Kinky Handicapping is his magnum opus. There’s something about the beauty of the thoroughbred and the color of the backstretch that brings out the lyrical side of many writers. Handicapping Magic by Michael Pizzolla

There haven’t been a lot of additions to the body of handicapping knowledge since the glory days of the 70′s and 80′s, but former Sartin disciple Pizzolla at least contributes something new with his Balanced Speed Ratings and Fulcrum Pace. I’ve spent countless happy hours with this book revisiting some old friends as well as learning about the greats before my time. Cramer virtually invented the idea of unconventional handicapping as a way of uncovering hidden value, and here he offers ways to use pedigree handicapping, company lines, and other contrarian methods to beat the speed handicappers at their own game.

Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand

A book that hardly needs an introduction, given the sensation it made when published. MPH contains a complete overview of the classic Sartin Methodology by its best-known (and perhaps most successful) practitioner. I can’t imagine a horse racing fan who won’t enjoy paging through this book.

Betting Thoroughbreds by Steve Davidowitz

For my money this is the best general handicapping book ever written, and a great place to start for novices looking to expand their knowledge as well as more seasoned players looking to move up. A great portrait of the greatest horse of all time.

General Interest Horse Racing Books

Speed Handicapping by Andrew Beyer

By the time this was written in 1993, speed figures had lost most of their value in the parimutuel pools, but Beyer is nothing if not a die hard figure player. Ragozin doesn’t give away the store here, but there’s still plenty of good information as well as an enjoyable read for horse racing fans.

Horse of a Different Color by Jim Squires

A great account of what it’s like to be a small time breeder by Jim Squires, the former Chicago Tribune editor turned thoroughbred breeder who hit the big time when he bred the Kentucky Derby winner Monarchos.

Figure Handicapping By James Quinn

As the title suggests, speed and pace figures are the focus here. Meadow is a serious player and the information here is rock solid.

Exotic Betting by Steven Crist

Most of the best handicapping books were written before exotic betting came to dominate the mutual pools, and this has left a big hole in the literature for horseplayers seeking the big score. It also requires solid money management, and that’s where Commonsense Betting comes in. My favorite part of the book details Beyer’s expedition into the virgin territory of Australian racing, where he attempted to use his figures to conquer the fat betting pools down under.

Commonsense Betting by Dick Mitchell

Winning at the track takes more than good handicapping. A meticulously researched account of Seabiscuit’s rags to riches story, as well as that of his owner, trainer, and jockey.

Money Secrets at the Racetrack by Barry Meadow

Many consider this the best book ever written on money management and the mathematical aspect of value betting and exotic betting. I’ve divided this article into two sections, one focusing on handicapping books, and the other on more general interest books. Beyer always interleavens his handicapping books with lots of good stories that bring out the magic of the track from the bettor’s point of view.

Secretariat: The Making of a Champion by William Nack

Nack is a long time Sports Illustrated writer who had unprecedented access to the great Secretariat and his connections during “Big Red’s” amazing career. Crist, an executive and columnist with the Daily Racing Form, has ably filled that hole with this book, which offers some solid strategies for tackling both single and multi-race exotics. A great book to dip into when a losing streak has you looking for new ideas.

My $50,000 Year at the Races by Andrew Beyer

Andy Beyer always delivers a good read, and this account of his home run year of 1977 when he beat the races for 50 large while splitting his time between Gulfstream Park and the Maryland tracks is one of my favorite racing books ever. In this book, recently republished by DRF Press, he brings together a comprehensive overview of most aspects of modern handicapping theory. The book is more notable for its exiting narrative than its handicapping secrets, but speed figures and track bias played a large part in his success.. I particularly enjoyed Ragozin’s war stories about his experiences as a horse owner and bettor (he and his partner Len Friedman have poured millions into the parimutuel pools over the years). Nack gives us a ring side seat for all the twists and turns leading up to his incredible Triple Crown Campaign. Davidowitz gives a solid treatment of virtually all aspects of handicapping from speed and pace handicapping to workouts, conditioning, trainers, pedigree, and betting strategy. If you’ve ever wanted to know about feet-per-second calculations, early, late and sustained pace, decision models, track profiles and all the other tools of high-tech pace handicapping, this is the place to start.

Champions by Daily Racing Form Staff

An awesome collection of lifetime past performance for every eclipse award winner since the see here


Handicappers’ Blog | At The Races

Charlie Goodwin

Charlie Goodwin

Sports betting can add excitement and fun to any game and will keep you on the edge of your seat throughout! Please remember, never give up as you have chosen one of the best businesses you could ever get into!
Charlie Goodwin

Latest posts by Charlie Goodwin (see all)

With Europe’s top older milers struggling to break the 120 barrier, Mutakayyef’s emergence is welcomed.

The Duchess of Cambridge proved a similar story as Aidan O’Brien’s Roly Poly raised her game to see off Magical Fire by half a length. From a ratings perspective, things slotted in neatly with runner-up Cymric appearing to reproduce his 109 gained when fourth in the St James’s Palace at Royal Ascot on his previous start.

This year’s 6f Group 1 Darley July Cup at Newmarket, the largest field since Sakhee’s Secret win in 2007, also featured eighteen runners writes Stewart Copeland.

Travelling well within himself off what was a decent pace from the word go, it always looked a case of when, not if, he would stamp his authority on the race. In beating a field of such depth and quality I have taken the view that he has.

Also, Frankel’s daughter Fair Eva has had her impressive Haydock success franked several times over as she waits for her next assignment.

This is based on third placed Gabrial returning to the sort off form he showed when third in both the Sussex Stakes and the QE II last year and Kodi Bear (sixth) running the same race as he did in the Queen Anne.

Limato all class in July Cup romp

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Alice Springs and Lumiere impress at Newmarket July meeting

The former proved herself a top-class 2yo last year with victory in the Cheveley Park and her rating of 116 saw her topped only by Minding (120) in the 2yo filly pecking order.

The general view at Royal Ascot was that Alice Springs was an unlucky loser of the Coronation and this result adds credence to that view. He was doing his best work late when fourth in the Chesham and here reversed the placings with Cunco; and that without getting a clear run here.

Quite where Limato goes next depends largely on him getting the fast ground he favours. Whilst he showed himself effective at this trip, his best form clearly remains at the minimum and I have him running to 112 here. It was no surprise to hear that the 5f Nunthorpe at York was next on his agenda.

Chasing him home in second was the five-year-old gelding Suedois, who has shown gradual improvement this year since joining David O’Meara. That confidence in the market, which eventually sent him off favourite, was not misplaced.

Both the historical and pre-race form standards line up on a rating of 121 and the impressive nature of his success fully merits crediting him with that level of performance.

If that was the appetiser, then Alice Springs provided the main course with success in the Group 1 Falmouth Stakes on Friday. The first five home in the Albany were covered by little more than two lengths. Rated 113 when a narrow fifth in the Group 1 Diamond Jubilee where, arguably, he was on the wrong side of a pace bias that day he franked that view in improving further still.

Not to be outdone, the boys hit back with a fine performance from Mutakayyef in the Fred Cowley MBE Summer Mile at Ascot on Saturday.

Both historical standards and a direct line through the Chesham form lead to a new assessment of 113 for Boynton. She still emerges with plenty of credit though and, given her effectiveness with give in the ground, it was no surprise to hear she will be targeted at some of the big sprint prizes in the autumn.

Mehmas saw off a new wave of competition from the Coventry with Silver Line stepping up in trip from the Norfolk, Ardad doing the same having won the Windsor Castle and a host of promising maiden winners.

It is obviously still early days for these fillies.

Boynton and War Decree are both hugely imposing colts and have already come a long way in just two starts apiece. A poor run in the 1000 Guineas led to various comments about whether she had been overrated, had not trained on or perhaps did not get the mile.

Having already shown a level of form good enough to win an average July Cup, it was a case of deciding whether Limato improved further still to win how he did. A winning performance of 103 ranks above only those of Arabian Queen (2014) and Please Sing (2008) since 1991.

Completing the frame in fourth was Profitable, much improved at 5f this year and winner of the Group 1 King’s Stand last time out when he ran to 117. Currently rated 115, she posted a figure of 112 on the day.

With both the clock and race standards pointing to a repeat of Mehmas’s 110 performance from Royal Ascot I took the view a reproduction of that form was good enough, nor did he seem to have much in reserve. With two wins from two runs since being gelded, this was the best performance of the 5yo’s career and I have raised his mark from 112 to 118.

Kentuckyconnection (fourth: pre-race 108), Atlantic Sun (fifth: 102) and Mohab (sixth: 98) each ran to, or within a pound of, their current marks. The 99-rated Mr Scaramanga remains with potential too. This was one of those cases where a couple of debut winners leap-frogged some more established types. Again the race looks relatively simple to rate as Always Smile (third) looks to have reproduced her current mark of 110 and that fits pretty well with Irish Rookie (fourth: pre-race 106) improving a pound to 107 and Ashadihan (fifth: 106) running a pound off her Coronation form.

Mehmas might have passed his latest test but he lost his status as the leading British juvenile following the 7f bet365 Superlative Stakes later in the week. Allocating him that rating puts him on a par with see here